Photo 19 Aug • 610 72x100cm, 14.10.1985   • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975	  • 493 100x80cm, 02.01.1984 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

• 610 72x100cm, 14.10.1985   • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975   • 493 100x80cm, 02.01.1984 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 18 Aug • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975	  • 612 195x100cm, 17.10.1985 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975   • 612 195x100cm, 17.10.1985 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 17 Aug 1 note • 245 81x70cm, 29.11.1977 (sold)    • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975	  • 614 80x54cm, 18.10.1985		

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

• 245 81x70cm, 29.11.1977 (sold)   • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975   • 614 80x54cm, 18.10.1985

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 16 Aug • 259 131x100cm, 08.10.1980    • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975	  • 259 131x100cm, 08.10.1980  		

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

• 259 131x100cm, 08.10.1980   • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975   • 259 131x100cm, 08.10.1980

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 15 Aug • 213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975	  •  617 96x145cm, 14.11.1985		

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

213 103x129cm, 04.02.1975   • 617 96x145cm, 14.11.1985

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 213) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, because size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes time in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 14 Aug • 214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975	  • 4a 210x130cm, 01.12.1968 (sold) 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975   • 4a 210x130cm, 01.12.1968 (sold)

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 13 Aug • 214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975	  • 217 129x103cm, 29.04.1975 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975   • 217 129x103cm, 29.04.1975 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 12 Aug 226 79x159cm, 17.05.1976 (sold)   • 214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975	  

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

226 79x159cm, 17.05.1976 (sold)   • 214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975  

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 11 Aug • 214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975	  • 271a 114x130cm, 26.05.1982 (sold) 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975   • 271a 114x130cm, 26.05.1982 (sold)

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

Photo 10 Aug 1 note • 214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975	  • 282 130x114cm, 15.10.1982 (sold) 

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction? 

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?

214 103x130cm, 14.02.1975   • 282 130x114cm, 15.10.1982 (sold)

First: Don’t be content with this little format here - if you want to learn, enjoy and improve your eye and aesthetic sagacity, you should —of course— try to get the best reproduction available, i.e. the most faithful to the original. A click on the image will take you there. Couldn’t be easier than that.

Now why do I take the pain in the first place? Of course, I did it for myself to begin with. I was curious about the result. This is an attempt to test the strength and validity of a work of art (in this case: No. 214) by contrasting it with other pieces of art in a museum setting (I call this a Louvre Test) - in this series with works of the same artist, after having done this with other artists and plain living environments as well. And I do have a pedagogical vein, also. That’s why you get a chance to grow on it, if you want to.

Try it, look hard and see for yourself! Why not experiment with samples of your choice? If I can do it, you can, too.

Also, as said up front, pay attention to the original, larger file as well, beacuse size matters a lot. Imagine how it might feel to be confronted with the original. How does this affect you? Would you like to get more of this experience or are you fed up with it fast?

Did you know that looking and seeing are different acts? Did you know that seeing is immediate, but looking takes a lot of time? Music consumes times in its own pace and then it is gone. But visual art stays with you all the time. You think you see all at once, but that is not it, that is just the surface, you have to look and feel as well. You have to engage with the object, explore and experience it.

Everybody knows you cannot translate music into words, but this is true for the visual arts as well. If you do not give it a chance, it will not talk to you.

Now, if it does, what does it talk about? What is it that intrigues you? What subject is it about, what is the message for you, if there is any? And what does that experience of letting yourself in with that work result with? Does it inspire, enlighten, warm you? Does it show you where to look deep within you? Does it help you to grow in the right direction?

You see, as I publish my result, it is all about you, nothing else. What is it that makes you look at these things? What are you looking for? What is your need?


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